Faux wood mantel

Faux wood mantel DEFAULT

Do you have that space in your home that is a little blah but technically OK? Like the space is functional but just not what you want? And you kind of have to give yourself permission to change it up? That’s how I felt about this fireplace located in my living room, lovingly called the “sitting and talking room” by my children. Enter the faux beam fireplace mantle! Read on to see how easy it is to create one of your own.

The fireplace overall wasn’t bad but it was relatively bland. I had whitewashed the brick when we first moved in which made a significant difference …but it always felt like it was lacking something.  The mantle was too wimpy and the space above looked squatty. To counteract the issues I had with this poor helpless fireplace, I decided to beef up the mantle with some reclaimed wood and add some height with molding above (which I will talk more about in another post).

Disclaimer: In the name of full transparency, please be aware that this blog post may contain affiliate links and any purchases made through such links will result in a small commission for me (at no extra cost for you). As an Amazon Associate and Home Depot Affiliate, I earn from qualifying purchases.

For links related to my home and mantle decor (and some other good supply options for this build), check out my Amazon Storefront. I have all the good stuff linked there and also found a pretty amazon faux mantle if you love the look but decide the building part isn’t for you. No judgement!

Supply List and Cost

Length of time for project: 4 hours

Cost: $0 with reclaimed wood and stain I had on hand. Less than $50 if you buy all new wood and stain.

  • What you’ll need:
  • (2) 1x10x12 pieces of wood (the width and length may vary depending on your fireplace and the look you want to achieve. I used 1×10 boards and then ripped them down to about 1x 8.5 with a length extending about 1 inch past the end of my current mantle on each side).
  • Exact cuts for my mantle: top board  73″ L x 8.5″ H- one long side straight, one long side beveled, both short sides beveled; front board  73″ L x 8.5″ H -one long side straight, one long side beveled, both short sides beveled; side boards  8.5″ L x 8.5″H- top and front edge beveled, bottom and back edge straight
  • Table saw- to cut long edge bevels
  • Miter saw- to cut short edge bevels
  • wood glue
  • Nail gun
  • Screw driver and 1.5″ screws to secure faux beam mantle to existing mantle
  • wood stain- I used Varathane Dark Walnut

What I learned: Cutting bevel cuts on the table saw isn’t nearly as scary as I thought! Obviously, a good level of respect for all woodworking equipment is recommended. Oh also, and very important, be sure to add extra length to account for the bevel cut! Make your calculations to the inside edge. You can see a bit more in action on my saved Instagram Highlights .

Get Going!

In order to make the fireplace a bit more substantial, I wanted to add a new thicker mantle. The old mantle was a thin white piece of wood maybe about an inch thick. Rather than rip that off and buy a true beam (heavy/expensive), I did some brainstorming and decided to create a faux beam fireplace mantle slipcover of sorts.

I was lucky enough to have some reclaimed wood on hand to use for this project. This wood is beautiful and has lots of texture. That said, never fear, you could make something very similar using box store wood and just beating it up a bit.

Reclaimed wood

The Process

Now to get to how it was done! This whole process was new to me so I was admittedly nervous because A) I hate using my tablesaw and B) I was going to use my tablesaw a bit differently than I had in the past.

Beveled Edges

To create a more seamless beam I needed to cut my wood at a 45° bevel. To do this was actually pretty easy once I got over my fear of trying it. You set the table saw at a 45° angle and just run the long edges through, the same way you would typically rip down a long board. The shorter side bevel cuts were done using my miter saw. One long edge of each piece was left straight (one for the top mantle where it goes against the wall and the other along the bottom front. The bottom front could also be beveled if you want to make a full box that closes off the front- I actually skipped this step and you can’t even tell!).

Assembly

The beveled edges were put together using wood glue and a nail gun (I put the nails in what would be the top of the mantle and angled down into the front board). The sides were attached the same way (beveled on the top and front edges, straight along the bottom and back). I created my mantle with a top, a front, and two sides, but left the bottom open. I was planning to add a bottom later but now that I have it fixed in my living room, you honestly can’t tell that the bottom is not there. So I may just skip that tedious step.  I suggest watching my instagram highlights to see a little more of the process in action.

  • Beam edge

Stain

Once the faux beam slip cover is assembled, it is time for staining. I used a new stain this time because I wanted something a little bit warmer and not as dark as what I had used in previous projects. This piece is obviously bigger than what I had before and I didn’t want it to overwhelm the space. Once the stain was dry I applied a top coat of polyurethane just to protect it a little bit more.

  • Prestain test
  • Stained mantle

Install

Now it is time for installation! And this part could not be easier. I just placed it right on top of the old mantle and put a few screws along the top back edge so that they cannot be be seen and the mantle could be removed in the future if need be. And at this point it is completely done. I must say, it looks really amazing and taking the time to do the beveled edges so that it looks like a beam is totally worth it! Much better than seeing the seams of a butt end joint.

  • Installed mantle
  • Beam corner

End Result

I did add some shiplap and crown molding above the fireplace which really finished off the fireplace by adding some great height and brightness. You can find that tutorial here and I hope you enjoy your faux beam fireplace mantle slip cover!

Sours: https://rockycanyonrustic.com/faux-beam-fireplace-mantle/

In this post, we’ll show you how to install a fireplace mantel using the variety of wood beam mantels we offer. Below are basic installation instructions for our line of faux and real wood mantels.

Before and after photo of a faux fireplace mantel installed.

How to Install Faux Wood Mantels

Available in custom sizing, and in a range of attractive textures, colors, and finishes, you’ll easily find a style that suits your design preferences.

  1. Just mount a 2 x 4 on your wall. When you’re installing mantelpieces less than 6″ high, you’ll need to cut down the 2 x 4 so that it will fit inside the opening of the mantel.
Mounting a 2 x 4 is the first step in how to install a fireplace mantel on your wall.

 

  1. Slide the mantel shelf over the 2 x 4.

 

Sliding the shelf over the 2 x 4 is the next step in how to install a fireplace mantel on your wall.

 

  1. Next, put screws through the top of the mantel so that it anchors into the 2 x 4. For added security, you can also apply construction glue to the edges of the mantel.
Put screws through the top of the mantel.

 

How to Install Yellowstone Mantels

Available in Unfinished style and in an attractive Walnut color, the Yellowstone mantel shelf is very easy to install.  Below are instructions on how to do this with the French Cleat that it’s supplied with.

Use a level while holding the mounting strip on the wall.
  1. Hold the French cleat mounting strip on the wall with its notch facing up. Make sure to use a level to make sure that it’s straight.
    Make sure the notch is facing up when mounting the strip to the wall.

 

  1. Make sure the notch on the mounting strip is facing up, as shown below.

 

Put 3 screws into the mounting strip when learning how to install a fireplace mantel.

 

  1. While holding the level, put three screws into the wooden mounting strip to attach it to the wall.

 

Place the mantel over the wooden mounting strip.

 

  1. Next, place the mantel on the wall over the mounting strip. Make sure the wooden strip on the wall and the inside of the mantel interlock securely.

 

Learning how to install a fireplace mantel can be done by anyone.

 

  1. You’re done!

 

How to Install Real Wood Mantels

Installing our real wood mantels is also extremely easy.

  1. Simply mount a 2 x 4 and on your wall.
  2. The mantel will slide easily over the 2 x 4.
  3. Next, screw the mantel to the wall. It’s a good idea to also use construction adhesive for extra security.

 

Real wood mantels mount to walls very easily.
Sours: https://www.fauxwoodbeams.com/blog/how-to-install-fireplace-mantel
  1. American bulldog garden statues
  2. Tunisia traditional clothing
  3. Photoshop compositing course

In this step by step tutorial, I’m going to demonstrate how to build a rustic faux beam mantel. I will show how I distressed the wood to give it an aged reclaimed look for a fraction of the cost of a real reclaimed beam.

Hey Guys! So recently I was approached by a neighbor for assistance with a project in her home. She and her husband had removed the old mantel from their fireplace in the living room because it was damaged. After removing the old mantel they both realized that they hated their existing fireplace. They didn’t know exactly how to refinish it or what direction they wanted to go. So we talked about various ways in which they could make some changes without breaking the bank. My neighbor loved the idea of painting the old brick white and adding a rustic wood beam mantel. She also had never really used power tools. So we worked together and this is what we came up with. She provided me with a list of things that she envisioned for her fireplace, in which I took and created a floating mantel that looks like it’s an old vintage beam that you’d find in some old farmhouse or barn. She and I then installed it together. Here’s what we did.

How to Build a DIY Faux Rustic Beam Mantel Shelf - Toolbox Divas

Materials

DIY Rustic Fireplace Mantel Toolbox Divas (6 of 25)

Tools

OK, Let’s Get Dirty!

Steps

Step 1. Cut the wood to size.

In order to achieve the illusion of a single beam or solid piece of wood, it’s important that the cuts for 3 of the sides of each piece be made at a 45-degree angle along the entire length of the wood pieces. The back of the mantel is flat and open. So the back will have a straight edge. You can make these cuts using a circular saw.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 44Step 2. Glue and Assemble the Beam.

Using wood glue and a brad nailer attach the front board to the top.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 43

This part may require a second pair of hands or really good clamps as you get everything in place.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 42

With the top board and front of the beam attached it’s time to add the side. 3 sides are cut at an angle while the part that faces the wall is flat.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 41

I used my Kreg multi-purpose layout tool to ensure that all of the sides were square.How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 40

Step 3. Age and distress the wood beam.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 39

In an effort to achieve an aged or vintage finish, I did a couple things outside of my norm. I had no clue what would work.  But I figured at the end of the day,  it couldn’t hurt. I mixed the wood dye I was using to stain the mantle with the wood filler and applied it along the seems.  I filled in nail holes and pretty much applied it everywhere.  I’m not sure I would have done this the same way if I had to do it a second time. LOL

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 38

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How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 37

It was all in an effort to make this mantel look as old and rugged as possible. (Remember when using the wood filler of this sort, you want to wear a respirator and use in a heavily ventilated area.)

I then beat the mantle with a hammer and literally any sharp object I could find in my garage.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 36

 

Step 4. Sand down the mantel.How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 35

I started with my oscillating sander and then I moved to my belt sanders so that I could create dents in the corners and on the edges in an effort to create more detail and depth. I went over everything with a coarse sandpaper, then a medium grit sandpaper. I sand it all down until it was smooth and wiped out any excess dust.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 33

Step 5.  Assess the distressed markings.  If satisfied, move on to the next step.  If more distressing is necessary, repeat steps 3 and 4.

I then stepped back and reviewed everything.  I thought the mantel could use some more character.  So using my Dremel and the sanding tip I carved into the edges and into the front of the pieces of wood.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 32

I even used a chisel to get in some nicks and scratches.  To be honest, you could really do this all day. So it is up to you when to know enough is enough.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 31

Once I felt like ththat’s enough I sanded the mantel down once again down to a finer finish, starting with 80 grit coarse sandpaper, the 100, then 150 and finally a 220 grit sandpaper.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 30

 

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 47

For the sandpaper, I used SandNet Disc by Diablo . This sandpaper is great because it lasts so long.  You can literally use them and shake it off or even rinse it off and reuse it.  Also, it takes off a tremendous amount of wood.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 47

Then I wiped dow the boards with a damp cloth.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 29

Step 6: Stain and apply paint treatment.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 28

Once I’d gotten the mantel to a desired distressed look I stained it using wood dye.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 23

For the corners and creveces I applied an acrylisc paint treatment, blending various shades of brown.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 26

Hahaha I loved using the scrap wood as my artist palette.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 24

I then sanded down spots with a fine 220 sandpaper before reapplying the 2nd coat of wood dye.  I loved the way the stain/dye took to the boards.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 27

Step 7. Mark the location of the corbels and cut the board for the bottom of the mantel beam.

Mark 10 inches from each side.  This is where the faux brick corbels would be placed.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 46

Using scrap wood plywood I cut out the board for the bottom of the mantel beam.  This board will not be seen.  All of the sides are cut in straight edges.  Then I drilled the pocket holes.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 22

Step 8. Create the faux brick corbels.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 21

Using 2×4 wood pieces cut the pieces needed to create the faux brick corbels. 2 sets at 7in., 5in., 3in., & 2.5in.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 20

Attach using wood glue.   So when I created the first corbel I attached using glue and clamped it all together.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 19

 

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 18But when I got around to the second corbel, I realized I was going about this all wrong.  I can quickly assemble the corbels with the help of my brad nailer.  So using wood glue and the brad nailer to hold the pieces in place I assembled the 2nd corbel.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 17

.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 16

You can do this either way.  If you have a brad nailer you can attach this way of just use clamps and wood glue.  With wood glue you do have to wait 24 hours for it to dry.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 15

Step 9. Attach the corbels to the bottom board.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 14

Attach the corbels to the bottom board before attaching it to the mantel.  This makes the addition of the corbels so much easier.  Each corbel should be placed on the pre-marked line on the board so that it is 10 inches from each side.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 13

Using Spax screws I attached the corbels to the bottom board.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 12

Step 10. Attach the bottom board to the mantel.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 10

Finally with the corbels attached I attached the bottom of the mantel using pocket screws.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 9

Step 11. Create the support beam for the floating shelf mantel.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 51The shelf support is simply 2×4 cut down to fit the length of the mantel so that the mantel can rest on it.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 50

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 49

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Step 12. Install the Mantel.How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 8

With the mantel fully constructed it was time to install this baby!  We started by pre-drilling the screw holes for the shelf support.  We used the Bosch Daredevil Multipurpose drill pits for this because they are absolutely amazing. These drill bits drill through wood and brick with such ease.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 7

With the holes predrilled we started the screw through the board on the floor.  I highly recommend prestarting the screws.  It makes the process easier.How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 5

We then matched the screws up with the predrilled holes in the brick and finished screwing each screw in place.  It was so easy.  I recommend using a screw like Tapcon ancors when working with a brick fireplace.  It provides a little more support.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 4

Make sure the shelf support is level before attaching the mantel to the support.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 3

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 2

Lastlly using some Spax screws we drilled the mantel to the back of the support beam.

How to build a Rustic Faux wood beam mantel or floating shelf - Toolbox Divas 1

 

WOW! What a world of a difference.  My neighbor’s family room looks like a totally different space.

DIY Rustic Fireplace Mantel Toolbox Divas (22 of 25)

I have to say that I love how the mantel turned out. It totally changed the look and feel of the room. It made me want to go back and create some faux rustic beam floating shelves for my house. The pieces of wood used to create this mantel actually look like a solid piece of wood. It has a reclaimed vintage feel. We transformed a dated fireplace with simply a little paint and rough lumber that you can easily find at your home improvement store.  The estimated total for the paint and materials used for this transformation: $50-60. Not bad at all.

DIY Rustic Fireplace Mantel Toolbox Divas (11 of 25)

DIY Rustic Fireplace Mantel Toolbox Divas (14 of 25)

 

DIY Rustic Fireplace Mantel Toolbox Divas (10 of 25)

Till Next Time. ~T.

Sours: https://toolboxdivas.com/mantel-build-rustic-faux-beam-diy/
How To Make A Faux Wood Beam Mantel
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    The color was really bad. We are restaining it to better fit our decor. It looks so much more natural now. I like that it is lightweight. We are putting it up over an outdoor fireplace in our latticed covered courtyard.

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At Houzz we want you to shop for Ekena Millwork 4"H x 4"D x 60"W Sandblasted Faux Wood Fireplace Mantel, Burnished Cedar part # MANUSD04X04X60BC with confidence. You can read real customer reviews for this or any other product and even ask questions and get answers from us or straight from the brand. When you buy Ekena Millwork 4"H x 4"D x 60"W Sandblasted Faux Wood Fireplace Mantel, Burnished Cedar or any product product online from us, you become part of the Houzz family and can expect exceptional customer service every step of the way. If you have questions about Ekena Millwork part # MANUSD04X04X60BC or any other product for sale, our customer service team is eager to help.
Sours: https://www.houzz.com/products/4h-x-4d-x-60w-sandblasted-faux-wood-fireplace-mantel-burnished-cedar-prvw-vr~146548769

Wood mantel faux

You guys…I did it!  I built this whole fireplace mantel all by myself!  I gave myself a high five when I was finished…I felt so accomplished!  This wood mantel was such an easy DIY project…you are going to love it!

I’m absolutely thrilled with how it turned out! I think the mantel is a nice break from the white tile and white shiplap.

The wood adds some much needed natural texture and warmth!  Of course a real chunk of wood would cost hundreds of dollars.  So naturally, I chose to make my own.  It was actually way easier then I imagined! It came in just under $35.

So many times I start a project and think, can I really do this?  I’m not a carpenter or a tiler or a professional…I’m a mom!  But then I think… YA, I AM A MOM…you bet I CAN do this!  BTW, this is my first tiling project ever…its not perfect, but I was excited to tackle something I’d never done before!  More on that later!

Long story short, my goal for this basement fireplace mantel was to spend as little as possible!  I used the penny tile scraps from my master bathroom reno (HERE) for the fireplace surround.  I even had left over grout! The shiplap on top was finished with extra wood strips from my daughters room makeover.  You can find my faux shiplap tutorial (HERE).

The wood mantel was a pretty basic construction.  1” x 8” pieces of lumber, cut to 68″ long, and then a couple of pieces for the ends.  I love how it turned out, and I can hardly wait to style it!

*These materials and instructions are for a mantel that measures 8″ x 8″ x 68″ wide. You’ll need to make adjustments according to the measurements of your own mantel.

One pieces of 1″ x 8″ lumber,  12 feet long

One piece of 1″ x 8″ lumber, 8 feet in length

Two pieces of wood veneer

Special walnut wood stain

Polyurethane

2-3 blocks of wood ( I used a 2″x4″ board cut into pieces that would fit inside the mantel) *These will be used to hang the mantel

Shop the Materials (click on image)

DIY Wood Mantel Tools:

Nail gun with 1.5″ finishing nails (if you don’t have a nail gun, you can use finish nails & hammer)

Miter saw

Wood glue

150-grit sandpaper

Rag or sponge for stain application

Stud finder

3″ construction screws

drill or screwdriver

Level

*Note:  When selecting lumber make sure to stand each board up and inspect it for warping and imperfections.  Choose carefully!

Shop the Tools (Click on image)

Wood Mantel Tutorial:

Using my miter saw, I cut my 8-foot piece of 1″ x 8″ lumber down to 68″ and my 12-foot piece of 1″x8″ into 2 boards, each measuring 68″.  Save the extras!  If you don’t have a miter saw you can always have the boards cut to size at Lowe’s or home Depot when you purchase them.  I ended up with 3 boards all measuring 68″ in length.

I balanced two boards on their edges, and placed one board on top, as shown below.  Since I was building inside I used a couple other boards to balance the 1×8’s on.  February is cold in Utah!

Using wood glue and my nail gun, I secured the boards together.

I used the remainder piece of 1″ x 8″ 8-foot board that I cut down to 68″ to cut smaller pieces to fill in the ends of the mantel. This cut measured 5.5″ wide. (Be sure to double check your own measurements. They could be different then mine.)



I secured the new pieces to the ends using wood glue and my nail gun.

You can see it wasn’t perfect, but I wasn’t concerned because this is where the wood veneer comes into play.  Remember when I said this was easy…well this is why!  The wood veneer covers the ends and hides all the imperfections!  I love and easy solution!

I placed the sheet of veneer on the side and traced the shape of the mantel side onto the back of the veneer sheet. I cut it out and adhered it to the side of the mantel.  Pretty simple when its a peel and stick veneer!

At this point I sanded all the edges of the wood veneer and blended them to the wood.

After wiping the mantel clean, I applied the special walnut stain to the mantel one side at a time.  Be careful to not to allow drip marks!  Once its dry, apply 1 or 2 coats of Polycrylic to prevent scratches!

Hanging the Wood Mantel

To Hang the wood mantel I secured 2 pieces of 2×4’s cut down to fit inside the mantel.  First find and mark the studs in the wall using a stud finder and pencil.



Using my level, I marked where each block should be placed in relation to the stud marks.  I screwed each block in place using my drill and  3″ screws.

Once the blocks were secured firmly into the studs, I laid my level across to double check my handy work!  Perfect!  Time to hang the mantel.  I marked on the wall exactly where each end of the mantel should be placed so that it was centered above the fireplace.  I also marked where the blocks would be on the top of my mantel so I would know where to nail it.  I hung the mantel from the blocks on the wall and nailed it into place using my nail gun!.

Sorry I didn’t photograph this step, but I had to use all my hands (and legs haha) to hold it up and nail at the same time.  You can imagine right!?  Anyway…This is the final product!

$50 Sliding barn door tutorial (HERE).  That was a fun project too!

Shop this post (Click & Slide)

Thanks so much for joining me today!  You can find me on Instagram @Remingtonavenue where I share spaces in my home and diy projects daily!  If you liked this tutorial, please pin the image below and help me share it with more friends!

 

 

 

 

 

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