Yamaha groove box

Yamaha groove box DEFAULT

Yamaha RM1x

The Yamaha RM1x is a groovebox manufactured by Yamaha from 1999 to 2002. It integrates several, commonly separate, pieces of music composition and performance hardware into a single unit: a step-programmable drum machine, a synthesizer, a music sequencer, and a control surface.

The front panel of the RM1x is angled slightly to facilitate tabletop use but Yamaha also produced an accessory to allow rack-mounting the unit.

The RM1x is organized into five blocks: sequencer block, tone generator block, controller block, effect block, and arpeggio block.[2]

Sequencer block[edit]

The sequencer block has three modes of operation: pattern mode, pattern chain mode, and song mode.[3]

All patterns, pattern chains, and songs are saved in non-volatile memory. The RM1x also has a 3.5" floppy disk drive for additional storage and archiving.

Patterns may be up to 256 measures long for looped playback, and up to 16 MIDI parts deep. Patterns may be grouped into named styles, with up to 16 patterns per style. Yamaha supplies 60 preset styles. Patterns may be programmed step-wise, like a drum machine, or recorded in real-time from MIDI input and control-surface buttons and knobs.

A sequence of patterns may be chained together in up to 999 chain slots.

The RM1x can save up to 20 songs at a time in memory, from sequenced or realtime recorded MIDI events.

Tone generator block[edit]

The RM1x has a Yamaha AWM2 tone generator block, producing sound in response to sequenced events, the controller block, and from the MIDI IN connector. Up to 32 notes can be played simultaneously from 16 timbres selected from 654 voices and 46 drum kits.[1][4]

Each voice has an independent filter with cutoff, resonance, and envelope control.

Controller block[edit]

The unit's control surface consists of a backlit graphic LCD, many pushbuttons, potentiometers, and rotary encoders. The potentiometers are user-assignable and can control multiple MIDI parameters in realtime during recording or performance.

A two octave pushbutton keyboard may be played in real time or using during stepwise pattern recording. This keyboard does not generate MIDI velocity or aftertouch information but the AWM2 tone generator will respond to such information if delivered by one of the realtime knobs or an external MIDI controller.

Visual feedback comes from individual red and green LEDs, several red seven segment LEDs, and a 240×64 pixel LCD with green backlighting.

The main sequencer CPU is a Renesas (formerly Hitachi) model 7014 SuperH-2 running at 28 MHz. Latest Main ROM Operating System version 1.13 is located in socket IC2 (42 pin dual-inline package DIP).

Effect block[edit]

Three effect systems are available simultaneously in the effect block: reverb, chorus, and variations.[1][5]

Reverb effects include hall, room, stage, plate, "white room", tunnel, and basement. Chorus effects include conventional, 3-phase LFO "celeste", and flanger.[6]

Variation effects include delays, echos, cross delays, early reflections, gate reverbs, reverse gate reverbs, rotary speakers, tremolo, auto-pan, phaser, distortion, overdrive, amp simulations, auto-wah, and equalizers.[6]

A digital low-boost with +/- 24 dB gain and selectable boost frequency is also available.

Arpeggio block[edit]

Arpeggios can be played on the built-in keyboard (not on external keyboard) in realtime, during performance or recording. Arpeggios may move up, down, or randomly with several sorting, holding, octave range, and transposition options.[7]

Notable users[edit]

Apollo 440, The Birthday Massacre, Crystal Distortion, Darude, Signal Electrique, Legowelt, Simian Sound Source, Nataraj XT and Soul Coughing are reported to be RM1x users.[8][9]

References[edit]

  1. ^ abcJohnson, Derek; Poyser, Debbie (February 1999). "Yamaha RM1X". Sound On Sound. Archived from the original on 6 April 2015.
  2. ^Owner's Manual, page 34.
  3. ^Owner's Manual, pages 35-36.
  4. ^Owner's Manual, page 37.
  5. ^Owner's Manual, page 39.
  6. ^ abList Book, page 10.
  7. ^Owner's Manual, page 62.
  8. ^"Yamaha RM1x Sequence Remixer". Vintage Synth Explorer. Retrieved 2015-07-28.
  9. ^"Darude - Artists". Darude. Retrieved 2015-07-28.

External links[edit]

Sours: https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Yamaha_RM1x

Yamaha RS7000

Yamaha's RS7000 is a groovebox with a difference. Incorporating a sequencer, sampler and a synth, it claims to offer everything you might need for modern music production. 

The 'groovebox' category of instrument is pretty much an invention of the last five years or so. So popular has it proved that more and more manufacturers have produced their own take on the idea, and at the moment you can hardly move for dinky boxes — from Roland, Korg, Boss, Yamaha themselves, and soon Emu — plastered with knobs and promising to produce the last word in hip sounds and effects. Yet with all the choice of groove synth/sequencers and groove sampler/sequencers on the market, there's no single box that will provide a sequencer, synth engine, and sampler, plus the essential knob‑driven real‑time controllability. Until now, that is. Because Yamaha have taken the logical step of combining those elements, creating an impressive‑looking console‑style instrument called the RS7000 Music Production Studio.

Look & Feel

The RS7000 comes hot on the heels of Yamaha's Motif workstation synth (see last month's SOS), and you would be forgiven for thinking that it might be a module version of that instrument. However, though it incorporates some elements from the Motif, the RS is not a Motif in a box. Its sequencer has things in common with the sequencer on the RM1x dance workstation (see SOS February 1999), and will even load RM1x Patterns. As for the integrated sampler, this doesn't offer the same functionality as the Motif's — as in fully‑fledged multisampling, key grouping and velocity splitting — but is rather best described as a deluxe phrase sampler.

The reasonably sized LCD and soft knobs further add to the RS7000's user‑friendly feel.The reasonably sized LCD and soft knobs further add to the RS7000's user‑friendly feel.Understandably for an instrument aiming to provide everything required for music production, the RS is lavishly supplied with knobs and switches. Its 64 x 240 backlit display works in conjunction with a set of labelled menu‑selection buttons (to access such modes as Voice Edit, Effect, Save/Load and Mixer — see pic below) and a system of four 'soft knobs' and accompanying buttons which allow fairly easy navigation of the pages under each mode heading. Soft‑knob and button functions are always clearly indicated in the display, and a button's accompanying LED lights when that button has a job in the display. A nice touch is that each menu‑selection button has a row of small linked dots screened next to it, the number of dots telling you how many display pages that button accesses (see below). It's just a shame that the front panel isn't raked steeply enough for ideal display readability. It would have been great if Yamaha could have angled the display, or (even better) given it Akai‑like hinged mobility.

Other front‑panel furniture includes a set of conventional sequencer transport controls, and 26 rectangular grey, white and black keys laid out like a keyboard (two octaves, E‑F), and used for a variety of tasks including note input and track selection, muting, and soloing. Finally, there are two rectangular, touch‑sensitive trigger pads whose most obvious use is programming drum parts two drums at a time (for example, kick/snare or open/closed hi‑hat).

What Hands Are For

One thing that's very immediate about the RS is the use of knobs for key sound parameters. There's a group of knobs for quick tweaking of LFO, Filter, Amplitude/Filter/Pitch EGs, Portamento and Pitch‑bend that make it easy to rapidly change a sound beyond all recognition, plus four 'mixer' knobs that let you quickly alter track volume and sends to the three effects processors. Sadly, there's no hands‑on Pan control; this is accessible only via the display. Three further knobs apply innovative 'Sequence Play Effects', and the so‑called Master Effects (eight interesting ways of messing up your sound, in a good way) also have dedicated knobs for altering key parameters instantly.

This really is a machine that makes light work of track creation: if you have the ideas, the RS7000, for the most part, will aid your endeavours. We were gratified to be producing tracks in 10 minutes or less, with a surprising amount of real‑time variation and extrapolation available courtesy of the voice‑tweaking controls, the funky Master Effects, Sequence Play Effects, MIDI Effects and Yamaha's Grid Groove 'feel alteration' system. The simplest material becomes complex and interesting with very little work. There are OS quirks that occasionally leave critical parameters a few button‑pushes out of reach, but most important controls are there in front of you, accessible by knob or button.

The downside is that not all spontaneous front‑panel knob tweaks can be recorded by the RS7000 itself. Movements of many of the knobs are recorded into onboard sequencer tracks as MIDI Controller information alongside note data, but the Sequence Play Effect and Master Effect knobs don't appear to transmit Controllers, so their movements aren't recorded (the Master Effect knobs transmit SysEx, so their movements can be transmitted externally). There's a slight reprieve in the form of the sequencer's Scene memories: Sequence Play Effect settings can be included in a Scene, but Master Effects cannot. Yamaha could perhaps have implemented a 'knob track' in the sequencer, as on the Quasimidi Rave‑O‑Lution, for recording control movements. As it is, to preserve all the fruits of those spontaneous sound‑mixing jams, you'll have to connect the RS to a recorder of some kind.

Making Tracks

Anyone used to sequencers should feel pretty comfortable programming parts with the RS7000. Users of other Yamaha sequencers, especially the RM1x, should be particularly at home.

The 16‑track sequencer has two facets: the Pattern sequencer, and the linear Song mode. The Pattern sequencer allows you to create music in chunks and chain them to create a composition, a method that fits well with the way many people work. It seems that this part of the sequencer has been derived from an auto‑accompaniment instrument, as it arranges Patterns as 'Styles' — sets of 16 sub‑Patterns (designated by letters A‑P) that would be verses, choruses, bridges, and so on in an auto‑accompaniment instrument. Each Pattern has 16 'tracks', and each track can have its own length, making Pattern creation even easier. Shorter tracks simply loop until longer tracks play out and then themselves loop. It's not a problem for us personally, but you can't switch between sequencer tracks while in Record mode.

Every time you record a Pattern track it automatically becomes a Phrase, available to any other Pattern. The RS has lots of preset dance‑oriented Phrases, including individual drum Phrases (solo kick, solo snare, solo percussion instruments, and so on), bass lines, synth chord sequences, and 'guitar' phrases. As for their quality — well, the demos on the supplied CD are made from preset Phrases, and they sound like release‑quality records. Obviously, you could make compositions just from preset Phrases (if you're that sad!), or use any of them in your own tracks. A better way of auditioning Phrase presets would be welcome. As it is, you have to put each into a Pattern track before you can listen to it.

Returning to Patterns, these are chained in one of two ways. Firstly, in real time, where a Style is chosen with a soft knob and 10 of the Patterns within it selected on the fly, as the music plays, via the black 'keyboard' keys (the same kind of on‑the‑fly Pattern selection can be done during live performance, but arguably 10 Patterns is not enough, and you can't trigger individual Phrases in the same way). The second way of chaining Patterns is via an edit list. Unfortunately, we found that Patterns chained in this list jumped and hesitated at changeover points. However, when the chain with the problems was converted into a Song, the timing anomaly disappeared.

Song mode is suited to long‑form composition, where you may feel limited by having to break your work down into sections. It is possible to copy and paste sections to fill out a Song, but Pattern mode is better at this job. The fact that Pattern chains can be converted into linear Songs gives certain advantages (such as the ability to overdub for the length of the piece) when it comes to further development. Many users will probably create basic backings — drum parts and bass lines, for example — in Pattern mode, then convert a Pattern Chain into a Song, adding parts best suited to linear recording afterwards.

Take Notes...

A similar range of recording and editing options is available for both sequence modes. For example, you can record in step or real time, with true step and grid options for the former, and overdub and replace options (with flexible input quantising), for the latter. Step‑time recording allows you to input notes at the current quantise level, while Grid offers an interface similar to classic drum machines. You choose a note and, using the bottom row of 16 'keyboard' keys, turn on or off an event that triggers that note. LEDs indicate whether a step is active. This mode is ideal for drum patterns, but interesting results are also possible with melodic lines. So while the RS's sequencer doesn't present itself overtly as one of the newly‑fashionable analogue‑style step sequencers, you can program it in a similar fashion.

Data can be copied, erased, moved, and even extracted to another Pattern or Song. Post‑quantising is available, as are playback 'groove' facilities, transposition, and velocity/gate time control. Chord manipulation tools let you create, for example, rather convincing guitar‑like strums (which are especially effective using the RS's pleasing 12‑string patch). As an example of the depth of the editing features, for the strum feature there's a Chord Sort page, where notes are arranged in the order that they'd be played on a guitar and a strum direction is selected, and a Chord Separate page, where full control, down to single clock pulses, is available over the gaps between note‑strikes in the strum.

Before leaving the sequencer, we should explain the Scene facility mentioned earlier. There are two types of Scene, one recording the position of nearly all the knobs, plus mutes, and the other simply recording mutes. Scenes usefully let you capture and automate complex Pattern or Song changes, for recall manually, or via a special sequencer track. It's just a pity you can only store five of each type per Pattern or Song — 25 would be more like it!

Sound Engine

As we said earlier, the RS's synthesis section isn't as powerful as the Motif's, but it's pretty capable nonetheless. Yamaha have specified a fairly typical AWM2‑based samples + synthesis affair, with Voices based on one or two 'elements' (the latter use double the polyphony of single‑element Voices). Though Yamaha plainly see the RS7000 as becoming a dominant force in dance music, they've hedged their bets somewhat on the sound front, providing both an average General MIDI bank of presets and some stabs at orchestral and other real‑world sounds. We wouldn't go out of our way for some of these, but the pure 'synth' side of the RS is good, with lots of variety, from subtle and a iry to industrial and hard. There's no 'bass boost' control, as on Roland's MC505, but similar results can be achieved with the four‑band Master EQ.

Backup of Patterns and Songs is possible to SmartMedia cards via the built‑in slot. An 8Mb card is bundled with the RS7000.Backup of Patterns and Songs is possible to SmartMedia cards via the built‑in slot. An 8Mb card is bundled with the RS7000.There are over 1000 voices and 64 drum kits, organised into banks according to type and easy to scroll through in the display. If you can't find quite the voice you're after, you can customise your own, but starting a voice from scratch is impossible — you have to edit a preset, offsetting its preset parameter values. This might vex the hardened programmer, but not as much as discovering that there are no user voice memories. If you want to change a preset Voice, you must assign it to a sequencer track, make tweaks, then save the whole Pattern or Song to SmartMedia card or SCSI drive. If you don't save it, you'll lose it on power‑down, because the RS7000 appears to have no non‑volatile memory. This seems an odd decision on Yamaha's part; it was the same with the RM1x, but the RS is surely a more upmarket instrument.

Voices are editable with standard subtractive synthesis facilities, although the elements in two‑element Voices aren't editable separately; changes are applied to the whole Voice, which reduces flexibility but does allow rapid sound‑shaping. You have access to a well‑specified resonant filter offering six filter characteristics, separate ADSR (Attack, Decay Sustain, Release) envelope generators for Amplitude, Pitch and Filter, and a Portamento control. There's also a multi‑waveform LFO which can be assigned to modulate each or all three Envelope generators, with Speed control and a choice of five waveforms, plus a user‑programmable wave option with its own graphic display. The last is worth exploring for creating custom timbral patterns or weird melodic offsets. Nearly all the parameters listed here are accessible immediately from the front‑panel knobs.

Conclusion

Anyone spending a few days with the RS7000 would have to conclude that it's a powerful tool for composition, remixing, creative phrase sampling and live performance. And if you need a single, portable, compact box that will do it all (sans keyboard), there's really no competition.

The RS can be addressed on several levels: courtesy of its vast preset Phrase library and large number of synth voices it could be used with little or no original input, but on the other hand we think it has the depth to satisfy even the technically and musically sophisticated user. The sequencer is versatile, the tone generator competent, good‑sounding and tweakable, and the sampler fast and clever. In terms of sheer impressiveness and fun, though, the RS's real‑time controllability steals the show. And don't think for a moment that it will only suit dance artists; pretty much any electronic musician or songwriter could use what it's got.

The main aspects of the RS that we'd change are the lack of dedicated voice memories and the fact that you can't create a new voice from scratch, the fact that there's no non‑volatile RAM on board, and that movements of the Master Effects knobs can't be recorded into Patterns. The ability to add synth expansion boards, as you can with the Motif, would be great, and an optional internal drive wouldn't go amiss. Still, SmartMedia cards are quite convenient, and there is that SCSI connector... The OS has its baffling quirks, and the manual is problematic (though at least it's on paper!), but the desirability of what the RS offers is such that we would largely overlook or get around these things.

The bottom line is that the RS7000 has set out to cover all the groovebox bases and, in our opinion, has largely succeeded, at the same time making itself potentially appealing to a larger audience than a groovebox tag would suggest. People are going to do great things with it.

Arpeggiator

The simple but effective arpeggiator seems to be derived from that on the RM1x. It offers up, down, random and two versions of up/down arpeggiation, over a range of up to four octaves, with a hold control. Arpeggiated notes can be sorted in terms of absolute pitch order, or in the sequence in which they were played.

RS7000 Features

SEQUENCER

  • 16 tracks.
  • 259,000‑note capacity.
  • 480ppqn resolution.
  • 1‑300bpm tempo range.
  • 1/16‑8/4 time signatures.
  • Input and post quantising (32nd‑note to quarter‑note including triplets).
  • Velocity modification.
  • Gate‑time modification.
  • Crescendo/decrescendo.
  • Roll creator.
  • Chord sort/Chord separate.
  • Shift clock (moves track in time to change feel).
  • Event‑list/copy and paste editing.
  • Imports/exports Standard MIDI Files.
  • Imports RM1x files.
  • Playback effects: MIDI delay, Beat stretch (expands or compresses MIDI data), Clock shift, Swing, Velocity and Note offset.

Pattern Mode

• 64 Styles, 16 sections each.

  • 256‑bar max Pattern length.
  • 5980 preset Phrases in 16 categories.
  • 256 User Phrases per Style.
  • 20 Pattern chains.
  • Real‑time/list Pattern chain.
  • Convert Pattern chain to Song.

Song Mode

• Linear 16‑track recording.

  • 20 Song locations.
  • Tempo track.
  • Scene/Mute track (records mutes and Scene changes).

SOUND ENGINE

• AWM2 subtractive synthesis.

  • 62‑note polyphonic.
  • 16‑part multitimbral.
  • 1054 preset voices.
  • Voice Categories: GM, Synth Bass & Lead 1&2, Synth Pad and Synth FX 1&2, Synth Material, Band Instrument, Classical Instrument & Wind, Ethnic & Percussion SFX 1&2, 63 preset drum kits.
EFFECTS

• 12 reverb types.

  • 25 delay types.
  • 100 variation effects.
  • Eight Master effects.
  • Master EQ.
  • Five types of track EQ.
  • Three send effects plus one Master effect at one time.

SAMPLER

• 16‑bit.

  • Mono/stereo.
  • 44.1, 22.05, 11.025, 5.5kHz sampling via analogue ins.
  • 48, 44.1 and 32kHz sampling via digital in.
  • 4Mb RAM, expandable to 64Mb (two SIMM slots).
  • Maximum sample size 64Mb stereo, 32Mb mono.
  • Maximum sample duration: 380 seconds at 44.1kHz.
  • Imports WAV, AIFF, A‑series, SU700 samples.
  • Editing Functions: Trim, Loop, Normalise, Time‑stretch with original pitch, Pitch‑shift with original length, Reverse, Frequency‑convert (halves sample frequency), Fade in/out, Loop Remix, Slice.

MIDI

  • Comprehensive MIDI spec.
  • 18 knobs control 31 onboard parameters and can transmit any MIDI controller data.
  • Most parameters respond to SysEx and can be set to transmit changes.
  • Can be used as a 16‑part multitimbral synth module.
  • Sequencer/arpeggiator sync to MIDI Clock or MTC.
  • MMC compatible.
  • Can be MIDI clock master.
  • Sequence tracks can address external MIDI gear.

CONNECTIONS

• Stereo jack inputs with access to effects engine.

  • Stereo jack outputs.
  • Headphone socket.
  • Footswitch socket.
  • SCSI‑2 connector.
  • MIDI In.
  • Two MIDI Outs.
  • AC mains power connector.
  • SmartMedia card slot.
  • AIEB2 option slot — adds six assignable jack outs plus optical/co‑axial S/PDIF I/O.

The RS7000 As Phrase Sampler

Programming Patterns and Songs with the sequencer and synth engine isn't the only way to create tracks with the RS7000. Courtesy of the built‑in sampler you can produce entirely sample‑based material or use instrumental or drum loops as a frame for programmed parts.

The sampler is very well integrated and doesn't feel in the least like a bolted‑on part of the instrument. There's only 4Mb of RAM to start with, which is not much use if you want to work with 44.1kHz stereo loops and apply any of the RS's more sophisticated processes. For example, after using the tool which slices up samples to allow them to be changed in tempo, a sample occupies 1.5 times its original space in RAM, and requires that in addition to the original sample during processing. Fortunately, RAM is expandable to a respectable 64Mb, though expanding to the max disables the base 4Mb. Still, RAM is cheap at the moment, so if we owned an RS7000 our first move would be to fill it to capacity. SmartMedia cards and connected SCSI drives can be set to auto‑load samples, or indeed whole sets (including Song, synth voice and sample data), making the RS a very handy solution for gig backing tracks.

Actually sampling is very straightforward, via analogue inputs, optional digital in, or from the mix of the RS7000 itself. The last is great for creating sampled loops from your own material, which you can then further embellish and manipulate. Sampled audio goes direct into a sample memory slot, or can be linked to a sequencer track (the sample still goes into the memory slot, but a MIDI event is created, on the designated sequencer track, which triggers that sample). It's all very neat. It's simple to import samples into the RS, too: it reads WAVs, AIFFs, Yamaha A‑series samples or SU700 samples from SCSI media, and can extract native samples from RS7000 Pattern or Song files. WAVs can also be taken from SmartMedia cards. We tried WAV and AIFF import from a SCSI Zip drive, which worked fine too.

Rather less convenient is Yamaha's division of sample slots into Local and Common types (128 slots each). The former are married to the sequencer track they were recorded into and can't be used by other Patterns or Songs. The latter can be used freely by any Pattern or Song. Obviously, if you might want to use the same sample repeatedly it's best to record it as a Common sample, but you have to really dig around to find out how to do this (by default the RS records samples as Local; when the 128 Local slots are full, it swaps to 'Common' sampling). The only way we found to make the choice was by entering Record Standby mode and selecting the Mixer menu. The first entry in this menu is for Voice Selection, and there in the Bank list are the 'SmpLocal' and 'SmpCmn' options. We can't see any reason for this arbitrary division.

Because of how the RS's sequencer and sampler are integrated, you can treat the sampler almost as an audio recorder (like the similar feature on the Motif), even recording live vocals into it, but the same caveats apply as with the Motif: record in small chunks if you're doing live audio, as it will be fiddly to try to remove silent bits in a performance and line up the remaining audio correctly with the rest of your track.

A good range of facilities is available for editing and corrective treatment of samples (see the 'Features' box for list). The quality of time‑stretching and pitch‑shifting is generally good, but best with small‑to‑moderate changes and speeding up rather than slowing down of samples. One interesting thing is that the RS won't let you 'munchkinise', or pitch‑shift without maintaining length. Serious sample editing can be undertaken, if you have a Mac or PC, with the supplied Tiny Wave Editor. You'll need a SCSI connector on your computer to use this.

So much for the standard stuff: it's when you want to get clever that this sampler really shines. The amazing Slice feature automatically cuts a sample into equally sized bits and assigns each to a MIDI key, at the same time placing MIDI events on a sequence track to trigger each sample. The net result is that 'Sliced' loops respond to changes in sequence tempo and alter speed without you having to do a thing. The excellent Loop Remix, derived from other Yamaha samplers, also dices a sample, in order to re‑assemble it with added weirdness (and it works on MIDI data too!).

As a phrase and loop sampler, the RS7000 can hold its head up high, but don't expect the 'instrument' sampling facilities, such as multisampling and keymapping, that you get from studio samplers like Yamaha's A‑series and larger Akais and Emus. You can create 'kits' of samples, where a different sample is played by each key (up to 128), and this facility could be turned to melodic use, but it's probably intended for drum‑kit construction.

Reverb, Delay/Chorus, Variation & Master Effects

The main send effects are configured as three processors, accessed by aux sends in the RS's mixer. The Reverb processor provides 12 spaces, including two halls, three rooms, two stages, a plate, tunnel, and a canyon. Twenty‑five effects are offered by the Delay/Chorus processor, including chorus, symphonic, flange and phase, plus various delays. Lastly, the Variation processor offers all the above, plus more standard fare (rotary speaker, amp simulation, multi‑compressor, distortion), various unusual processes (such as digital turntable and talking modulator), and some two‑ and three‑way combination effects. Generally, the effects quality is fine; the reverbs can be a bit cheap‑sounding, but the delays, modulation and off‑the‑wall effects are impressive.

The global Master Effects (Slice, Lo‑Fi, V‑Distortion, Ring Mod, Multi Comp, Control Delay, Dynamic Filter and Isolation) aren't 'mastering effects' as the manual implies, but offer serious (and very fashionable) sound manipulation. They're permanently patched into the RS7000's output; you simply switch them on or off, and tweak their four parameters.

Pros

  • Sounds, sequencing, sampling and effects in one box.
  • Comprehensive real‑time control.
  • Inspiring performance/remix tools.
  • Sampler well integrated and upgradable to 64Mb.
  • Free 8Mb SmartMedia card and wave editor.
  • Built‑in SCSI.

Cons

  • No dedicated Voice memories.
  • Edits lost on power‑down unless saved externally.
  • Only 4Mb base RAM (disabled when full 64Mb is installed).
  • Not all knob movements recorded by internal sequencer.

Summary

Yamaha really have done their research to create this powerful and currently unique presentation of sampling, synthesis, sequencing and real‑time control.

Sours: https://www.soundonsound.com/reviews/yamaha-rs7000
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Desktop Control Synthesizer with Analog Physical Modeling (groove box)

Awesome synth desktop module/ groovebox.  Compared to the Roland D2, which I’ll call “the good groovebox”, this is “the evil groovebox”.  The patterns are very aggressive, stylish and actual.  The 5-note polyphonic VA engine is very powerful and full.  The drum sounds are also very good.  Edgy and “underground”, this machine is perfect for Industrial, Techno, Electro and many other genres.

Yamaha AN200 audio demos

These are the three factory demo-songs in the AN200 – they do a good job at capturing the huge variety of styles achievable on this machine:

Yamaha AN200 manuals

AN200EDownload

AN200EditorEDownload

Yamaha AN200 specs

  • Super-powerful VA tone generator;
  • plenty of features both for live and studio work;
  • High quality sounds and patterns;
  • Portable, lots of knobs
Year of release 2001
Timber1 (AN) + 3 (AWM2)
Polyphony 5 (AN) + 32 (AWM)
Sound generation method Analog Physical Modeling
Preset patterns:256 preset, 128 user
MIDI: In, Out
Sound expansion capabilities: No
DisplayYes, 7 segment LED
Sequencer Yes
Arpeggiator 
Effects Yes
Touch sensitivity No
Aftertouch
OutputsStereo outs, headphones out
AccessoriesCD-ROM; AC adaptor
Dimensions338.0mm (W) x 208.9mm (D) x 51.7mm (H)
Weight1600 g

Yamaha AN200 links

www.yamaha.com

Sours: https://synthmania.com/category/groovebox/
Yamaha AN200 demo: closer look at the virtual analog synth and drum sequencer

Audiobus: Use your music apps together.

Thought I'd ask here, since I'm stuck. I've been looking at using hardware instead of computers / iPads, since I already spend too much time in front of a screen and I'm easily distracted by other apps.

It has to be 1 box, ideally battery powered which I can take and just start making music with. I like to create electronic beats, so I need something that can generate drum and synth sounds, maybe also with the option of PCM. Good effects and a song mode should be likewise in the package. So far, the electribe 2 seems to check all the boxes.

Here comes the problem: I want to be able to jam, but also see the notes, make corrections, etc and I can't find anything that offers this. Electribe 2 + the OP1 pattern sequencer would be awesome, but this product doesn't exist or I can't find it.

I've looked at the MPC Live (very nice, but no synth), Elektron Analog 4 (no visual sequencer), Workstations from Roland or Yamaha (sound generation and sequencer seem really cumbersome), the Novation Circuit (unlabeled "universal" knobs, no screen at all), Electribe 2 (no visual sequencer).
The E2 seems to be very nice, but I'm not sure I would be comfortable using the pad lights for sequencing.

P.S: if you're wondering why not iPad - because I always end up reading a book, or watching tutorials or browsing the web. Yes, I am weak :P

Sours: https://forum.audiob.us/discussion/29037/hardware-groovebox

Box yamaha groove

yamaha RM1X groovebox, sequencer, drum
    165
  $   190

yamaha rm1x, drum, groovebox, sequencer

-> good condition, works fine!

- > comes with power supply and manual

The RM1x is a great new pattern based instant dance music machine! It sounds great! The patterns are perfect and inspiring forms of trance, house, hardcore and more with tons of great analog-like sounds and drum kits. The RM1x also features plenty of effects, filters, knobs, and MIDI control. The patterns have a whopping 16 parts (that you can drop-in or out in real-time performances) for lavish and professional productions. Making dance music has never been easier!

For those of you who want to get a little deeper into creating your own tracks, patterns and sounds, there is more. As if the awesome preset patterns aren't enough for you, creating your own 'phrases' is easy. You can modify a phrase's variation, instruments, sounds, tempo, filtering, LFO, and effects until you've morphed it into something of your own. Then store it into one of the 50 user patches. Creating an entire song is also pretty easy. Knobs, mutes, and patterns can be changed on the fly or meticulously programmed in. For the best all-in-one music box that will make you famous for a day - chose the RM1x over the rest! It is used by Apollo 440, Crystal Distortion, and Signal Electrique.

- attention: there's a small dent at the back of the sequencer.

- international bidders, please contact me for international shipping rates!

Product Information as described by Yamaha

The incredible Yamaha RM1x is a complete dance-music workstation that is both a real-time performance instrument and a powerful production tool. An intuitive "hands-on" interface makes realtime operation easy for artists with a DJ background, while in-depth sequencing and editing functions make it possible to create the most complex original patterns from scratch.

The RM1x also features a great-sounding tone generator with an enormous selection of great dance sounds built in. If dance is your style and you want the most powerful performance and production tools right at your fingertips, it doesn't get much better than this: the Yamaha RM1x Sequence Remixer.
An extensive arsenal of 700 outstanding dance-oriented sounds. An awesome assortment of 50 preset styles, 960 pattens ans, 726 phrases.
8 assignable real-time control knobs, a large LCD display panel with 4 display knobs and a large multi-function keyboard.

Each "style" has up to 16 "sections" which can be switched in real time during playback via the RM1x keyboard.
Powerful 16-track sequencer with 110,000-note memory and 480 clocks/quarter note resolution lets you record original material via the RM1x keyboard or an external MIDI keyboard using a versatile range of record modes: realtime replace, realtime overdub, punch-in, step, and grid.
In-depth sequence editing functions make it possible to creat and refine complex patterns and musical textures with extraordinary precision.

Edit and refine the RM1x voices to create sounds that most ideally suit your own music.
A sophisticated multi-effect system can be used to add anything from subtle ambience to wild variations.
Realtime “Play Effects” including harmonize with unison and octave functions, beat stretch, clock shift, gate time, and velocity offset.
Built-in floppy disk drive for convenient, low cost data storage and retrieval.
Full MIDI compatibility.

Specifications as described by Yamaha

SEQUENCER

Memory Capacity

110,000 notes

Timing Resolution

1/480 quarter-note

Polyphony

Maximum 64 simultaneous notes

Tempo

25.0-300.0

Recording Methods

Realtime (Replace, Overdub, Punch-in), Step, Grid Step

Sequencer Tracks

16 tracks

Tracks per Pattern

16 tracks

Preset Patterns

960 (60 styles x 16 sections)

User Patterns

800 (50 styles x 16 sections)

Preset Phrases

7,726

User Phrases per Style

256

Pattern Chains

20 songs

Songs

20 songs

Edit

Song edit, Phrase edit

Jobs

36 pattern jobs, 8 pattern chain jobs, 28 song jobs

Split

Split song, Split pattern

Grooves

Grid Grooves (Note Offset, Clock Shift, Gatetime Offset, Velocity Offset)

Play Effects

Play Effects (Beat Stretch, Clock Shift, Gatetime, Velocity Offset)Harmonize (Unison, Octave, Harmonize 1, Harmonize 2)

MIDI Delay

MIDI Delay edit, Feedback edit

Arpeggios

Type (Up, Down, Alternate 1, Alternate 2, Random), Sort, Hold, OctaveRange

Sequence Formats

RM1x format, SMF (Format 0)


TONE GENERATORS

Tone Generation

AWM2

Polyphony

Maximum 32 simultaneous notes

Multi-Timbral

Maximum 16 timbres (last-note priority with element reserve, DVA)

Preset Voices

654 normal voices, 46 drum-kit voices(excl. GM normal voices and GM drum-kit voices)

Effects

11 Reverb types, 11 Chorus types, 43 Variations

Digital Low Boost

+-24dB/50Hz-2.0kHz


GENERAL

Display

64x240-dot backlit graphic LCD (adjustable contrast)

Connectors

PHONES, OUTPUT x 2 (L/MONO,R), FOOT SWITCH, DC IN, MIDI IN, MIDI OUT

Disk Storage

3.5-inch 2DD/2HD floppy disk drive

Power Supply

YAMAHA PA-5C or equivalent AC adaptor

Dimensions

420(W) x 282(D) x 98(H) mm

Weight

4.4 kg

Included Items

Demo Disk, YAMAHA PA5C or equivalent AC adaptor

Options

Footswitch (YAMAHA FC4 or FC5)

You can conveniently save and load RM1x data at any time and load SMF (Standard MIDI File) data created on other sequencers or computer-based systems. You can then use the RM1x's editing features and/or realtime control capabilities to "remix" the data to create the groove you require.



Sours: https://www.popsike.com/yamaha-RM1X-groovebox-sequencer-drum/200152315615.html
The Search for the Best Groovebox

Lives for gear

The Casio XW's remind me of a groovebox in a keyboard like the Roland JX-305. They are surprisingly cool and powerful and I would love to get one. If only Casio had made them 10-15 years ago.

Best sequencer: The Yamaha RS7000 and Rm1x. RS has better sequencer and sounds and it samples but I preferred the Rm1x UI and form factor a lot more. I replaced my Rm1x with the RS, sold the RS and would like to buy one or the other. I have an A3000 sampler still, so with an Rm1x it does most of the RS and maybe some extra.

Had a QY70, too, same basic sequencer.

Not quite grooveboxes but best sound: AN200, DX200 and Roland SH32 (I know I am the only one who likes that last one.)

Second best samplers: I quite liked the DR202 and SP202 combination, still have the DR. Always wanted a SP505 or 606, perhaps I will get one

Funnest, purest grooveboxes: the Korgs. They kept in the X0X tradition while doing new and weird things. ES-1 and ESX are the best samplers, the EA, ER and EMX are wonderful and surprisingly powerful instruments. And Korg is making Electribes again! So the didn't die out. Also the Monotribe.

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cramseur's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 15 years

I thought Radikal Technologies' Spectralis was te best sounding.

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robotunes's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by lilita➡️

Not quite grooveboxes but best sound: AN200, DX200 and Roland SH32 (I know I am the only one who likes that last one.)

no, you're not

i've said it before, i'm a groovebox hore. i've owned them all and still have quite a few. from that era, i pick the mc909's synth engine and effects. not sure why OP says its sequencer is basic. rs7000 gets a run every now and then too.

agree with most other comments here. surprised no one has mentioned the realtime fun of the v2.0 command stations. loved that engine. couldn't stand editing it (and i have a black belt in menu diving).

love all pre-2010 grooveboxes (even you, mc09!) but octatrack is king of this castle.

Quote:

Originally Posted by robotunes➡️

surprised no one has mentioned the realtime fun of the v2.0 command stations. loved that engine.

Because it was just as crappy as the other versions... But with more menu diving and buttons with tap-as-shift. Okay, so I never used pre 2.0 OS very much, and I think the update was good, but I really think they effed up with the grid record feature, it's hardly useable when played live, unless you loop the bar, but good luck even doing that right if you're not using anything other than the standard 16-steps per bar, change the resolution and you still won't be able to work in that mode.

I guess if all you do is work in realtime record, it's a good sequencer... But I thought part of the fun of grooveboxes was to be able to sequence them, hell, even the mc-303 got that right. Actually wvery single groovebox I've owned got it right, excluding the command station.

It's such a cool device though... I can't part with it knowing how powerful it is, but I also know that it's likely to sit in my closet for years because it's not fun to work with.

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Quote:

Originally Posted by robotunes➡️

no, you're not


MC-09 lol that was a fun box.

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shaft9000's Avatar

did someone mention the DARK STAR yet?

might as well, since we're just naming every friggin' 'groovebox' ever made in this thread....

but yeah, of all i've tried the Spectralis 2 sounds the business
while the electribes are the easiest to grock

Quote:

Originally Posted by shaft9000➡️

did someone mention the DARK STAR yet?

might as well, since we're just naming every friggin' 'groovebox' ever made in this thread....

but yeah, of all i've tried the Spectralis 2 sounds the business
while the electribes are the easiest to grock

Dark Star?

No sequencer, no drum sounds. Just a cheap VA. Not sure that counts.

Quote:

Originally Posted by RobotsVsChildren➡️

Dark Star?

No sequencer, no drum sounds. Just a cheap VA. Not sure that counts.
Agreed, it does have an 8-step formant sequencer I guess, but... yeah, just a VA. The Korg Radias has limited sequencing, but I'd hardly call that a groovebox.

Wikipedia has a pretty good definition of a groovebox. Mostly everything that's been discussed so far has largely been a groovebox. Even the Casio is called a 'groove synthesizer', which I'd say is what the company was going for.

Also, I know others were nervous prices would go up because of a thread like this, but it takes something like an article that gets thrown around a lot to raise the prices, which is precisely what happened here.

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DJRAZZ's Avatar

Quote:

Originally Posted by lilita➡️



MC-09 lol that was a fun box.
MC-909 gets my vote. My only regret is not getting one when they were new...

But the mc-909 is way cheaper now than it was when it was new!

Quote:

Originally Posted by acemonvw➡️

But the mc-909 is way cheaper now than it was when it was new!

I can attest to that. Scooped one up for a song. (no pun intended)

What about this new Akai Rhythm Wolf? That seems to meet the basic requirements. The snares sound kinda weaksauce to me but the price is right.

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DJRAZZ's Avatar

Quote:

Originally Posted by acemonvw➡️

But the mc-909 is way cheaper now than it was when it was new!

I like to buy something when it is shiny and new, even if it is NOS. I am OCD that way. I just love the feeling of a new piece of gear that has never been used except by me.....

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robotunes's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by RobotsVsChildren➡️

What about this new Akai Rhythm Wolf? That seems to meet the basic requirements. The snares sound kinda weaksauce to me but the price is right.

and because it's a near-groovebox, i have to have it. i love the idea of trying to make a whole album using only the rhythm wolf and a kp3. i argue that the lack of fx keeps it from being a groovebox).

Hmm... I don't know about the Rhythm Wolf. Not that it matters whether it is or is not a groovebox. Can patterns be chained together? I think that's a big distinction. My Korg Radias can have sequences, but these 'patterns' cannot be chained, thus it isn't a groovebox. Sure, I can create whole songs using it, but it takes some work doing so.

I often equate groovebox with 'all-in-one' unit and I think that's what they are or should be... Of course, if you're good enough, you can write complete songs with things that are pseudo-grooveboxes (like the Rhythm Wolf), it'd likely be a limited song, but that's sometimes what makes it good. Artists that limit themselves to a medium can have better direction and write something far better than if they had free range to use everything in the world (sort of like how there's an inverse relationship between the number of gear owned and the amount of music created... I can personally attest to that).

It's funny though, despite grooveboxes usually being completely self-contained instruments, I'm extremely baffled as to how terribly difficult some of them are to create music with (I look directly at the command station's on this). Great ideas... but terrible implementation.

I'm actually reneging my opinion of the Roland MC-909. After this discussion, I've been picking up more of it and am finding it to be a good middle ground between the MP7 and the RS7000... It's got the simplest sequencing engine for sure of the 3, but it's synth engine is almost as good as the MP7's (and I think way better than the RS7K) and it can sample (unlike the MP7). Yes, the other two have good tricks up their sleeves, but the MC-909 has far more simplicity, and sometimes that's what helps you make a track.

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PorchBass's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 5 years

I had a DX200 - it was fun but the sequencer would miss the first note when changing sequences, which rendered it a bit of a doorstop. I wish yamaha would release an FM groovebox that worked! Don't forget the filter is a bit 90's sounding and steppy too
Quasimidi 309 sounds excellent if you avoid the 90s filters on every part!
I feel old.
Really an MPC is the best sequencing solution for me.

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My worst purchase ever was a MC-505. What a joke that thing was!

Quote:

Originally Posted by PorchBass➡️

I had a DX200 - it was fun but the sequencer would miss the first note when changing sequences, which rendered it a bit of a doorstop.

Yeah, my AN200 does that too. Seems to be par for the course on both of those units. Mine has the jumpy main encoder as well. I just use it as a sound module sequenced from something else, which it is (to me) a pretty pleasing VA but as a groove box, not so great.

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robotunes's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by acemonvw➡️

I'm actually reneging my opinion of the Roland MC-909. After this discussion, I've been picking up more of it and am finding it to be a good middle ground between the MP7 and the RS7000... It's got the simplest sequencing engine for sure of the 3

can you explain what you mean by "simplest sequencing engine"?

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mpresev's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

I love Grooveboxes when they came out and I still like them.

I loved my MC303 because it was my first synth and sequencer.


I like the

MC303 because - I love the sequencer(I can control the gate and velocity), 808 and 909 drum samples.. The only thing I didn't like was the 28 voices? and MIDI out is not good because it won't control your gear from what I remember..


I like the
RM1X Yamaha because - it controlled my AN1X, EMU Emax, EMU ESI32, ORBIT by EMU in 2000. The Yamaha gave me 16 tracks to sequence and arrange.. some good sound in it too.. I don't have this setup anymore. 32 voices, disk drive, no sampling feature.. But it's work it to control your synths and samplers.

I like the
RS7000 Yamaha because - it's the brother to the RM1X, better sounds(better drum kits), easier to arrange and sequence music.. It got traded for a ticket Hawaii in 2013. I didn't need it because I use REnoise now which is like the
RS7000 in software form.. 64 voices, sampling feature(very slow though)


I'd love to try the new KORG Groovebox, MC909, EMU Groovebox(the yellow one), ELEKTRON(all of them), KORG Electribe EMX/ESX

Quote:

Originally Posted by robotunes➡️

can you explain what you mean by "simplest sequencing engine"?


Sure, each track within a song must have the same beats per measure on the mc-909. You can have individual track length on the other sequencers, giving you more polyrhythmic beats. If one track is four bars on the mc-909... All other tracks are 4 bars. The rs7000 also has a clock divider so you can change the rate of the beat per track (or part, whatever you call it). So, I would argue that the mc-909 has a simple sequencer inside. It's not bad, but it's not as dynamic as the others...

Quote:

MC303 because - I love the sequencer(I can control the gate and velocity), 808 and 909 drum samples.. The only thing I didn't like was the 28 voices? and MIDI out is not good because it won't control your gear from what I remember..

Finally... someone else likes this beast I don't mind the 28 voice limit. I honestly don't seem to hit its peak like I do with the MP7 or MC-909. I max those things out in a hurry for some reason! I think it's because each note trigger might take up more voices? Or the FX section is way more complex so that eats up a lot of power. I don't know.

Quote:

I'd love to try the new KORG Groovebox, MC909, EMU Groovebox(the yellow one), ELEKTRON(all of them), KORG Electribe EMX/ESX

If you can, I'd suggest the Monomachine over any of the other ones. Clearly this is just my opinion, but what you can do with it is phenomenal. Its synth engine is extremely capable of making drum sounds as well as good synth sounds.

If you were to get any of those things I'd say do it in this order: Monomachine > EMX/ESX > MC909 > Volcas > EMU Command Station.

Here's what the monomachine has done for me:

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I would love a Monomachine. Machinedrum, anything Elektron really.

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mpresev's Avatar
 


My Studio

🎧 10 years

Quote:

Originally Posted by acemonvw➡️

Finally... someone else likes this beast I don't mind the 28 voice limit. I honestly don't seem to hit its peak like I do with the MP7 or MC-909. I max those things out in a hurry for some reason! I think it's because each note trigger might take up more voices? Or the FX section is way more complex so that eats up a lot of power. I don't know.


If you can, I'd suggest the Monomachine over any of the other ones. Clearly this is just my opinion, but what you can do with it is phenomenal. Its synth engine is extremely capable of making drum sounds as well as good synth sounds.

If you were to get any of those things I'd say do it in this order: Monomachine > EMX/ESX > MC909 > Volcas > EMU Command Station.

Here's what the monomachine has done for me:

Hey Acemonvw, I loved that MC303.. WHen I was trying to collaborate with bands at that time, they didn't take the gear seriously..I would get comments like "only two outs?" lol. but when they heard my demo's, they couldn't believe it.. I frankly should of not traded the MC303 for a phrase sampler. Oh well, rookie me.. I do want another one.. I can get one cheap. They are fun boxes.

Quote:

I would love a Monomachine. Machinedrum, anything Elektron really.

Yeah, their gear is top notch. From my limited experience, they really thought long and hard about it. My only issue with my monomachines is that every pattern is the same tempo. I realize there is a work around, but I'm too lazy to figure it out. Might end up upgrading my monomachines with the +drive, which might help. Just contain each set of songs as the same tempo, then go over to a new folder, or however it works...

Quote:

Hey Acemonvw, I loved that MC303.. WHen I was trying to collaborate with bands at that time, they didn't take the gear seriously..I would get comments like "only two outs?" lol. but when they heard my demo's, they couldn't believe it.. I frankly should of not traded the MC303 for a phrase sampler. Oh well, rookie me.. I do want another one.. I can get one cheap. They are fun boxes.

The drum sounds are phenomenal in the MC-303. The synth sounds take a bit of work, but geez, for ~$100, that thing does a lot. The FX are okay and sequencing isn't too bad either. The whole thing has a bit of a dirty sound to me, that ends up sounding quite nice. Being one of the first grooveboxes, I think it deserves a little more credit. They did most things right, not even grooveboxes developed years later had most things right. Sure, they're more complex, but with that complexity came poor implementation. The MC-303 had little to go off of in terms of design and function, but rarely do I say, "wtf were they thinking?" Something I often say with the others.

Quote:

Originally Posted by GuruInSpace➡️

My worst purchase ever was a MC-505. What a joke that thing was!

My thoughts exactly. There's no escaping from the awful Chemical Brothersque demo songs with the most horrible Roland 1080-series sounds.

I owned the box back in the day for a few months but I still feel there was some potential left undiscovered and since then I've been looking for a good deal for an MC-505. I think it can be a box full of surprises!
Sours: https://gearspace.com/board/

You will also be interested:

Sampling Units & Groove Gear

Generally speaking, synth players express themselves musically using the keyboard. There is, however, another class of product that has been optimized specifically for dance music and thus is not equipped with a keyboard. Instead, these products—namely, sampling units and groove gear—are played by means of pads, buttons, and dials, as well as a ribbon controller for scratching and other similar techniques.

In 1995, Yamaha released the SU10—a sampling unit that was capable of sampling sounds at CD-level high quality, and as with the QY Series, had a compact design no larger than a VHS video cassette. In addition to sampling and playback, this instrument also supported DJ techniques such as scratching and crossfading thanks to a built-in ribbon controller. The CS1x Control Synthesizer released the following year had a similar color scheme, so from both design and functional perspectives, there was a strong sense that these two instruments were well suited for use together.

Introduced in 1998, the SU700 featured a sampler, a sequencer, an effects unit, and a mixer, each of which had professional-grade specifications. It was marketed as a “sampling remixer”—a new type of instrument capable of revolutionizing music production through the creation of intense, edgy sampling phrases. The SU700 came with a built-in 3.5-inch floppy-disk drive for data storage as standard, and SCSI support was available as an optional extra. As such, it could hold its own with the rack-mounted A Series samplers that were introduced around the same time.

Also released at the end of the nineties, the RM1x groovebox featured a tone generator optimized for the dance music scene together with serious sequencing power in place of sampling. Its advanced functionality could be used to create remixes; meanwhile, sequence data could also be controlled in real time. This made it possible to create inspired, high-octane phrase sequences—one of the most popular features of this highly original instrument.

As the successor to the SU10, the SU200 that we introduced in 2000 could automatically synchronize up to six loop samples having different tempos. This loop machine also allowed its player to control playback tempo and a wide variety of other parameters on the fly, and despite its compact design, the SU200 supported synchronized playback with the RM1x, among a host of other real-time operations.

Sours: https://de.yamaha.com/de/products/contents/music_production/synth_40th/history/column/sampling_unit_groove_gear/index.html


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